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What CMS do Foundation users use?

Hi guys,

Just a quick question for web designers/developers out there who use Foundation.

What CMS do you guys use?
What does Zurb use for their clients?

I have been learning for a while but have never really gotten into any CMS. Wordpress drives me crazy and I really don't want to learn PHP (I have decided that I will put in the time to learn it though!). I writing websites from scratch but I can totally see the benefit of giving a CMS to a client, as well as being able to use themes as a starting point for projects.

In my brief experience of Wordpress, I've absolutely hated using their WYSIWYG/Visual builder tools as I can't seem to customise it how I want.

I would love to hear of what you guys use. If you do use Wordpress can you point me in the right direction in learning to develop without their Visual Builder tools?

Thank you so much for taking the time to give an answer to a newbie!

wordpresscmsClientsWYSIWYG

Hi guys,

Just a quick question for web designers/developers out there who use Foundation.

What CMS do you guys use?
What does Zurb use for their clients?

I have been learning for a while but have never really gotten into any CMS. Wordpress drives me crazy and I really don't want to learn PHP (I have decided that I will put in the time to learn it though!). I writing websites from scratch but I can totally see the benefit of giving a CMS to a client, as well as being able to use themes as a starting point for projects.

In my brief experience of Wordpress, I've absolutely hated using their WYSIWYG/Visual builder tools as I can't seem to customise it how I want.

I would love to hear of what you guys use. If you do use Wordpress can you point me in the right direction in learning to develop without their Visual Builder tools?

Thank you so much for taking the time to give an answer to a newbie!

Kyle Tuczynski over 2 years ago

Hi Hugh,

I primarily work in Wordpress when building out a custom site using foundation. If I were you I would take some time and learn about the true power of wordpress and its components along with foundation. Try wordpress 101, its worth it for a beginner. If you get stuck with foundation utilize their documentation along with github and google search. Chances are someone else ran into a similar problem and that will give you a stepping stone. PHP is a basic language to learn. Unfortunately its not always glitz and glamour but will help you resolve some of those issues you were mentioning above. WP also has advanced customer fields or ACF if you want complete customization. I utilize those on daily basis. CMS give you and you client great control over content and the ease of wp for your client will help your reviews. Also once you get a grasp of it dev time is super quick.

Best

Hugh Js over 2 years ago

Thanks Kyle.

Do you the in-built drag/drop UI builders or do you code from scratch? Thanks for the advice I am watching some videos now and will try and learn how to vet started!

By the way. What is your workflow like? Do you start with a blank theme like jointsWP or underscores and then build on from there?

Thanks

Kyle Tuczynski over 2 years ago

Let me give you a better learning method than telling you my routine. This method is very similar to a realistic dev cycle. Find a site you like, nothing crazy and keep it simple. This will be your dev mock up. build out the front end using foundation frameworks and any additional JS, etc required, then try to convert those static pages building out your backend with a CMS. Aka hack and butcher your work down to the few lines it takes to make it function. With wp it's simple php calls. Check out wp codex for Wordpress info it's all there. Learn the wp loop first and foremost. The rest falls into place.

Lynda Spangler over 2 years ago

I use Adobe Business Catalyst (BC). It's not a perfect CMS but it works well for almost all of my clients and has a lot built in. BC handles the server side stuff so I can concentrate on building my sites using HTML/CSS/JS. It's perfect for Foundation in my opinion.

Also, BC has a templating engine based on Shopify's Liquid. Works well and isn't too difficult to learn when you need to perform more complicated task that the server should run.

Hugh Js over 2 years ago

Thank you Kyle & Lynda.

I haven't seen or used BC yet. I think Wordpress is the best option (for me at least) at this stage. Due to the popularity of it I think it would be wise for me to learn it.

I've always wondered what CMS Zurb uses, as well as other big agencies. Building sites without a CMS seems easier at this stage for me but that is really not helpful for clients in this day and age... specifically for small businesses.

Is anyone aware of what CMS Zurb uses?

Lynda Spangler over 2 years ago

I would recommend using a CMS because they offer so much for both you and your clients.

About what CMS to use can be tricky with how many are available. My biggest advice, from my experience, is find a CMS that you are comfortable with that fits the needs of most of your clients. If you find one that you are comfortable with using it goes a long way.

About agencies. I've spoken with various agency owners, both large and small. They find one or two they like. One agency owner I know uses BC for most sites and Magento for large eCommerce sites. Others use Wordpress, Joomla, Drupal, Shopify, Big Commerce, etc.

With that said, there are many agencies that use a custom CMS that was developed by that agency. I wouldn't be surprised if ZURB uses a custom solution with the talented team they have.

Dave Brockmeier over 2 years ago

If you're starting out, make sure the skills you're learning are not domain-specific. Don't waste any time with drag & drop theme builders. The knowledge you gain using those will not carry over to other projects.

Learn HTML and CSS. Understand them deeply. Then add a CMS. Otherwise you're wasting your time. Take it from someone who did all of the above and wishes he'd just learned CSS from the start.

Snapper Cridge over 2 years ago

Big fans of LightCMS here. Our business structure is built around it and have been using it for about 6 years.

Our clients absolutely love it. It's easy for us to design and custom build using Foundation with our own HTML, CSS, and JS and letting the system deal with all server function. Hosted system, so you don't have the same finite control of say Wordpress or Concrete5 (our second choice if client won't part with host), but enough control that we don't really need that level of control.

Definitely good to know HTML, CSS and then dig into basic javascript, jQuery and/or AngularJS. But make sure you don't skip learning Sass! That has been the single most important education I have learned in the past year.

Tom Wheeler over 2 years ago

I'm a Drupal themer / developer.. that's my CMS of choice. I've recently written a blog post on using Foundation 5 with Drupal 8 (which just came out). I didn't realize Foundation 6 was out, so I haven't yet done a project with it.. but I'm excited to try it.

http://www.wheelercreek.com/articles/theming-drupal-8-with-zurb-foundation-5

Val Ery over 2 years ago

Hi!
I use Drupal (is my favorite CMS). Now create a theme based on the ZF6. I want to include maximum features. Of course, with the selection you need and what is not.
(Drupal 7 and Foundation for Sites 6)

Chris over 2 years ago

Hi,

I think you should consider static site builders, too!

You could use jekyll (jekyllrb.com) to build the site, and use a service like http://cloudcannon.com/ to let the nontec users edit the site. Didn't try it, but it sounds awesome. It's letting you build the site how you want it (in your text editor).
With this package you're ready to go with jekyll and Foundation 6 and have an awesome build process with browser livereload: https://goo.gl/XE9jdK
But there are other static site builders like Middleman or Octopress an so on... But Jekyll I think is the most popular.

Or you simply use the Zurb Workflow with panini:
http://foundation.zurb.com/sites/docs/starter-projects.html#zurb-template

I heard the sourcecode of Wordpress is really ugly. Because of that i learned about concrete5 (CMS, www.concrete5.org). It's really cool. For this I made a package, too. If you want to go with Foundation 5 and concrete5: https://github.com/core77/foundation_sites
There are many Foundation and Bootstrap based themes on the concrete5 marketplace...

Chris

Brandon Arnold over 2 years ago

@Hugh Js We actually have transitioned to mainly Static Sites for most of our websites, since everyone in house codes, it makes it much easier. We create custom rails backends for other projects, like our blog and smaller projects. We tend to stay away from CMS's for internal work, but i'm loving the discussions on here from the community.

Scarlett765 over 2 years ago

I have been using Ninja Post, The charming interface is simple for both users and administrators, while a live-feed approach is used by default on the homepage, giving community members a look at the latest threads as they roll in.

Mark Szymanski over 2 years ago

Ultimately you'll want to round your self out with a few different CMS's or frameworks. I would recommend starting with WordPress. Any CMS will take a little time getting comfortable with and WP starts to get pretty comfortable to work with. The admin GUI is one of the best for clients to work with and it's just pretty ubiquitous these days. It's a good CMS to know.

As mentioned above I'd also recommend looking at a couple static site generators like Jekyll or Hugo (Panini?). And perhaps a couple flat-file CMS's like Kirby and Grav.

Michael C. over 2 years ago

Nooo, for the love of [insert whatever here] don't go the WordPress route... and all you people recommending it as a CMS should be ashamed of yourselves! WordPress is no more a CMS than Trump is presidential material; sure, it might kinda sorta work, but that's not what it's meant for and not what it's best at. WordPress is a great blogging platform that can be hacked (as in modified... altering PHP code) 6 ways from Sunday to do what you want, but it is NOT a CMS.

For a proper CMS, try something like Craft (https://craftcms.com/) or ExpressionEngine (https://ellislab.com/expressionengine). Both have free versions to let you get a taste for how they work, and you can even launch personal sites using the free versions.

The best thing about both of those platforms (and I'm sure many other REAL CMSes out there these days) is that they don't get in your way, HTML-wise. Their code output is 99.9% customizable by YOU, the designer. They also do a great job at content modelling - adjusting the sections and fields in those sections to perfectly suit YOUR content.

Needless to say, both work perfectly well with Foundation (or TBS, or whatever else you may want to use) - like I said, the HTML output is completely in your control, from <!doctype> to </html>. :)

Brenden Sparks over 2 years ago

We use a CMS by an enterprise solution provider for higher education called OmniUpdate. Their CMS (OU Campus) is XML/XSL-based and completely language/environment agnostic, so it's pretty adaptable to all the weird homebrew solutions universities end up coming up with.

Drupal and Wordpress are also in some use, along with Canvas as an LMS.

Todd Richards over 2 years ago

After spending the last two days fixing a clients hacked Wordpress site (from another developer), I'm going to echo Michael C.s comment above and suggest you look at other options besides WordPress. As he mentioned, ExpressionEngine and Craft get out of the way of your HTML and are extremely powerful when it comes to building websites. I have been using Foundation with ExpressionEngine since version 4, and it is great. You might also look at Perch (https://grabaperch.com/).

Eneas Marín over 2 years ago

Hi!

Well that was a very good question. I have worked with Wordpress, Joomla and Prestashop and I think they are quite useful, as long as you don't add any extra functionalities. Otherwise the maintenance starts to feel like a seven-headed monster.

I am using Foundation with a MeteorJS based CMS and I am quite happy.

Now a new eCommerce project has fallen into my hands and want to use Foundation in the front-end but I do not know which CMS to use. So I am listening to all the feedback you may give me about LightCMS, FlatCMS and their possibilities for eCommerce

Eneas Marín over 2 years ago

Hi!

Well that was a very good question. I have worked with Wordpress, Joomla and Prestashop and I think they are quite useful, as long as you don't add any extra functionalities. Otherwise the maintenance starts to feel like a seven-headed monster.

I am using Foundation with a MeteorJS based CMS and I am quite happy.

Now a new eCommerce project has fallen into my hands and want to use Foundation in the front-end but I do not know which CMS to use. So I am listening to all the feedback you may give me about LightCMS, FlatCMS and their possibilities for eCommerce