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Requirements really required? (Git/Ruby/Node/etc..)

I've been looking at the different intro information in the Getting Started section, and I have a (probably dumb) question about all the requirements. I'm hoping to use Foundation with Sass on a Windows & PHP stack.

So, the sass section lists the following requirements:
Git
Ruby
NodeJS
Bower
Grunt
Compass
Libsass

Do I really need all that? It seems like We need Ruby/Bower to install Grunt which is needed to watch Sass folders and compile them with Libsass. Is that right? So, if I'm already using something like Scout to watch folders and compile sass then do I need all that stuff?
Why is Git a requirement? Nice to have, maybe, but is it required? Needed for Bower, which also needs Node and npm? (so I need a package manager to install a package manager???)
Can't I just download the html/sass files and use them on a PHP server?

The applications section is all about Ruby/Rails, which I don't really know anything about. Is there any advantage to the foundation gem over a static files download?

I guess it just feels weird to have to run Ruby (and NodeJS) to be able to develop on PHP. I don't know anything about ruby, but isn't there going to be a performance hit on running it in the background in addition to a PHP server?

Any thoughts?

php sass installation requirements

I've been looking at the different intro information in the Getting Started section, and I have a (probably dumb) question about all the requirements. I'm hoping to use Foundation with Sass on a Windows & PHP stack.

So, the sass section lists the following requirements:
Git
Ruby
NodeJS
Bower
Grunt
Compass
Libsass

Do I really need all that? It seems like We need Ruby/Bower to install Grunt which is needed to watch Sass folders and compile them with Libsass. Is that right? So, if I'm already using something like Scout to watch folders and compile sass then do I need all that stuff?
Why is Git a requirement? Nice to have, maybe, but is it required? Needed for Bower, which also needs Node and npm? (so I need a package manager to install a package manager???)
Can't I just download the html/sass files and use them on a PHP server?

The applications section is all about Ruby/Rails, which I don't really know anything about. Is there any advantage to the foundation gem over a static files download?

I guess it just feels weird to have to run Ruby (and NodeJS) to be able to develop on PHP. I don't know anything about ruby, but isn't there going to be a performance hit on running it in the background in addition to a PHP server?

Any thoughts?

Wing-Hou Chan almost 6 years ago

Hi Bill,

I'm just like you, not wanting to install all that lot but I plan on moving over once I have the time.

You can use Foundation with SASS just with Scout. No need for Git, Ruby, etc, etc. Take a look at this thread for some info: http://foundation.zurb.com/forum/posts/857-upgrading-to-f5sass-without-compass--ruby--

The standalone SCSS assets can be found here: https://github.com/zurb/bower-foundation

I notice you are doing some PHP development. Just compile SCSS to CSS locally and upload to the server, (that's what I do at the moment, not sure if there is anything quicker, hehehe).

You ask about advantages. I'm not sure if this is true as I don't use the command line, though I've heard about it: you can get updates, patches and fixes to SCSS/JS components easily by using the command line. I'm sure there are a lot more but this is one I know.

bill almost 6 years ago

Thanks. That seems perfect.
If anyone else knows of any other advantages of running the full app stack to get Foundation then please let us know. Otherwise I'll start with that and something like Scout or Prepros.

Wing-Hou Chan almost 6 years ago

Just re-read Foundation Doc's "Getting Started with Sass".

Here's a rundown on the system requirements as I see you've got a bit confused with what you need and what for.

You will need:

Git - This allows you to update Foundation when fixes are released

AND

Ruby - This allows you to run Compass
Compass - This allows you to compile your SCSS assets

OR

Node.js - This will allow you run Grunt
Grunt with Libsass - This allows you to compile your SCSS assets.

So you only need "Git and Ruby with Compass" or "Git and Node.js with Grunt with Libsass". Now that I've written it like that it's easier to understand what you need and what for. :D

bill almost 6 years ago

Er. Ok.
That sounds easier, and I'm sure you're right... but the page isn't at all clear.

I'm with you on the
Ruby+Compass
OR
Node+Grunt+Libsass
for compiling sass. (although it could be read another way too)

But I'm not really getting the relationship between Git, npm and bower and ruby in the first section. (I'm not getting the Git requirement at all).

Is it:
Npm+bower for updating and ruby for installing?

I'll probably stick with scout, rather than all that. But that seems to mean that I wont get easy updates via bower.

Matic Zakrajsek almost 6 years ago

I've just managed to successfully set up a scssphp (http://leafo.net/scssphp/)

I've put on root style.php:

$directory = "scss";
require "scssphp/scss.inc.php";
scss_server::serveFrom($directory);

  • Foundation scss files are in scss folder.
  • scss.inc.php is in scssphp folder

In my HTML I just simply call Foundation CSS by:

<link rel="stylesheet" href="/style.php/foundation.scss" />

It looks like that it works perfect.
Anyone else has any experience with this setup? Can I expect some problems to arise?

Julie Lewis over 5 years ago

THANK You! This helped a lot.

FYI - Compass does have some nice mixins that make SASS development a bit easier, and it's nice to be able to type "compass watch" at the command line.

Brandon Arnold over 5 years ago

The real benefit comes from upgrading to our point releases easier.

Julie Lewis over 5 years ago

I would argue that's a disadvantage, since upgrading from 4.2.3 to 4.3.1, 4.3.2 broke quite a bit of stuff for me - including Orbit which is on my home page. And after days I still can't figure out how or why. I had to back out the upgrade.

Steve Roberts almost 3 years ago

I agree with Julie, upgrades have often broken stuff for me too. It all seems far more complicated than it needs to be.