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microdata schema - responsive hidden content?

I'd like to add microdata per google et al schema.org spec to my website for better indexing by all the search engines - especially google (of course).

Google now suggests adding microdata using schema.org schema.
Essentially you add data to your tags - or add span tags if necessary - to create a search engine meaningful data hierarchy (call it semantic if you must).

My Question: In building a responsive website, inevitably some text will not appear (e.g. only appears on the desktop - not mobile). Some text will be different but have similar content (e.g. a shorter version of a blurb for mobile), and so is essentially repeated in the HTML. The question is, do you repeat part of your microdata hierarchy for both the mobile & desktop (and maybe tablet too) text? Also, will the search engines cough up a hairball and lower your ranking if they see that you've tagged with microdata some text which does not appear at all on some devices?

What's the best practice for microdata when HTML contains parallel universes and is no longer the simple hierarchy the schema designers imagined?

microdataschemaGoogleResponsivesemantic

I'd like to add microdata per google et al schema.org spec to my website for better indexing by all the search engines - especially google (of course).

Google now suggests adding microdata using schema.org schema.
Essentially you add data to your tags - or add span tags if necessary - to create a search engine meaningful data hierarchy (call it semantic if you must).

My Question: In building a responsive website, inevitably some text will not appear (e.g. only appears on the desktop - not mobile). Some text will be different but have similar content (e.g. a shorter version of a blurb for mobile), and so is essentially repeated in the HTML. The question is, do you repeat part of your microdata hierarchy for both the mobile & desktop (and maybe tablet too) text? Also, will the search engines cough up a hairball and lower your ranking if they see that you've tagged with microdata some text which does not appear at all on some devices?

What's the best practice for microdata when HTML contains parallel universes and is no longer the simple hierarchy the schema designers imagined?

Glenn Philp over 5 years ago

Question: Are you stating that you are duplicating the content on the same page and serving different amounts of information to the user?

It sounds as though you might be hiding some information from mobile users, which is highly discouraged. As per Google, you should instruct Google and Google Mobile on the pages to crawl, if you are duplicating content on the page you could very easily get pinged and lower your ranking as GoogleBot might think you are trying to stuff fluff or spam.

Question: Is this pertaining to a blog article or a landing page that leads to each article?

All your articles should contain one author or at very least a publisher. There is even mark-up for your company logo that Google has recommended for better schema results.

You can list multiple schema's on the same page. However duplicate content would hurt your rankings. If you feel that the users need a completely different mobile experience then you might consider multiple templates with dynamic content and one page having the rel=canonical href.

Here is a great infographic about RWD: http://visual.ly/why-responsive-design-important-10-key-statistics

Be careful of hiding to much as it bloats your web page and can essentially slow your page load.

I realize there is a lot more information here than just a straight-forward answer about schema. However, there are multiple pieces that go into SEO ranking and schema is just to help the search engine make since of your structured content.

Max Rockbin over 5 years ago

The whole concept of Mobile First is that the basic core of what a user needs is present in the mobile version. If you have more space in tablet or desktop formats, you can elaborate and include more info and features on the same single page. In my case, I have a shorter blurb describing a property on my mobile view, but on the desktop view, there is naturally more text. That text might be thought of as "hidden" from the mobile view since it is present in the HTML but simply not displayed when the viewport is small.

SO I do have duplicate content in the sense that the shorter blurb and the longer blurb cover the same material and both are in the same HTML. But only one is displayed to any given user.

My site is not a blog. It is an Apartment Management site. It includes a list of available apartments with a description in both mobile and larger views. Those views simply don't have identical content, though they describe the same thing. For example, I use Foundation's Interchange to display a smaller thumbnail on mobile. Similarly I use the "small-only" and "medium-up" options to display different content to different devices.

So, let's look at a simple case:
A great little courtyard apartment
A wonderful courtyard garden community just blocks from Forest Park, offering hardwood floors, Spanish tile, and one of the best locations in Portland etc etc etc blah blah blah yadda yadda yadda lorem lorem lorem

In both cases the microdata would be essentially a "description" of a product or an offer. Should I apply the microdata to both? To just the longer? I dunno. Hence my question.

(right now my page is running at 95% on pingdom, so bloat from a little extra text is not an issue).

Glenn Philp over 5 years ago

The scenario listed you would only use description from the Thing schema once, which I would use the longer more detailed description.