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Coder | Jerusalem, Israel

Been messing with HTML since '95, and coding professionally since 2002.

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Michael C. commented on Michael C.'s post over 3 years

Sooo..... 

Michael C. commented on Michael C.'s post over 3 years

Here's the code I'm testing:

  $(document).on('open.zf.reveal', function()
  {
    alert("Reveal opened");
    var modal = $(this);
    modal.find('.close-button').focus(function()
    {
      alert(".close-button focused");
    });
  });

Basically I'm trying to put the focus on the close button after the reveal opens. I've added some alert()s for debugging.

The first alert() triggers immediately after the click, before the reveal is, well, revealed. The second one never triggers.

Michael C. commented on Hugh Js's post almost 4 years

I just installed my first WordPress site yesterday to have some first-hand knowledge of the system. Spent a while looking around for how to create custom post types, only to find out that that capability, which is absolutely (pardon the pun) foundational to being a CMS, is done via an add-on.

Calling WordPress a CMS is like calling the US Government a standing military force because it has the US Army/Navy/Air Force as an "add-on". O.o

I stand by my recommendation: Use WordPress only if it actually suits your needs - a blogging platform. If you need a proper CMS... use one. Don't shoehorn WordPress into that role.

Michael C. commented on Hugh Js's post almost 4 years

For an eCommerce solution, I'd really recommend using a dedicated 3rd-party service such as Shopify. However, FYI Craft's developers, Pixel & Tonic, just released their 1st-party CraftCommerce package that works with CraftCMS. Initial reviews are glowing. :)

FWIW, ExpressionEngine has 3 good-to-great 3rd-party e-commerce add-ons.

I'd still recommend using something like Shopify though... e-commerce is enough of a unique beast that - like CampaignMonitor or MailChimp for email - it's best to use a professional company dedicated to providing that solution as a service rather than rolling your own platform. That way at the very least, you benefit from having the burden of security headaches and system upgrade nightmares taken off your shoulders. :)

Michael C. commented on Hugh Js's post almost 4 years

Nooo, for the love of [insert whatever here] don't go the WordPress route... and all you people recommending it as a CMS should be ashamed of yourselves! WordPress is no more a CMS than Trump is presidential material; sure, it might kinda sorta work, but that's not what it's meant for and not what it's best at. WordPress is a great blogging platform that can be hacked (as in modified... altering PHP code) 6 ways from Sunday to do what you want, but it is NOT a CMS.

For a proper CMS, try something like Craft (https://craftcms.com/) or ExpressionEngine (https://ellislab.com/expressionengine). Both have free versions to let you get a taste for how they work, and you can even launch personal sites using the free versions.

The best thing about both of those platforms (and I'm sure many other REAL CMSes out there these days) is that they don't get in your way, HTML-wise. Their code output is 99.9% customizable by YOU, the designer. They also do a great job at content modelling - adjusting the sections and fields in those sections to perfectly suit YOUR content.

Needless to say, both work perfectly well with Foundation (or TBS, or whatever else you may want to use) - like I said, the HTML output is completely in your control, from <!doctype> to </html>. :)

Michael C. commented on Michael C.'s post over 4 years

Thanks for the links, Rafi. After a bunch of work, I've got the basic aspects working - switching tabs pauses one player and plays the other one from the timestamp -5s.

However, I'm having major issues with the fine-tuning... without going into details, it appears that Foundation only has a 'toggled' (i.e. after the tab switches) event, whereas I need to hook into a 'toggle' event - one that triggers before the tab switches.

Any ideas?

Michael C. commented on Mike Mannakee's post over 4 years

I'm getting this as well, but for me, even your code doesn't help. It appears like I'm seeing the 'toggled' event get triggered both on mouseup as well as on focus. :-/

When a tab has focus in the browser, and the entire browser loses and then regains OS focus, the 'toggled' event gets triggered once.

When I click on a different tab, the 'toggled' event gets triggered twice - once when I press the mouse button, and the second time when I release the mouse button. Because those are two separate events, not even the 'toggle_fired' flag is able to prevent things from being fired twice.

Michael C. commented on Christian's post over 4 years

Whatever else, that name has GOT to change: https://www.google.com/search?q=fapp

Michael C. commented on Michael C.'s post over 4 years

After looking at things more, the commit you referenced only affects when the main button triggers a modal. I'm using separate JS-based pop-up windows, not Reveal modals. It's the right idea for sure, but how to get it to apply to a call to open popup windows?

Michael C. commented on Michael C.'s post over 4 years

I think you meant this pen, Rafi: http://codepen.io/rafibomb/pen/WbzZOM ;)

What I'm wanting is for both the button, as well as the link(s) inside the dropdown to trigger popup windows. I don't want the pip that triggers the dropdown menu from also triggering a popup - that's the problem I'm wondering how to fix.

I'm not using a button group because a split button is more compact, and because it inherently indicates which action is the default one that most users will want to use, while making the alternative actions fairly simple to discover.

Also, I simplified the dropdown menu in my example here; in reality, it has 2-4 links (most of which will need to open a popup).

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You commented on Michael C.'s post over 3 years

Sooo..... 

You commented on Michael C.'s post over 3 years

Here's the code I'm testing:

  $(document).on('open.zf.reveal', function()
  {
    alert("Reveal opened");
    var modal = $(this);
    modal.find('.close-button').focus(function()
    {
      alert(".close-button focused");
    });
  });

Basically I'm trying to put the focus on the close button after the reveal opens. I've added some alert()s for debugging.

The first alert() triggers immediately after the click, before the reveal is, well, revealed. The second one never triggers.

You commented on Hugh Js's post almost 4 years

I just installed my first WordPress site yesterday to have some first-hand knowledge of the system. Spent a while looking around for how to create custom post types, only to find out that that capability, which is absolutely (pardon the pun) foundational to being a CMS, is done via an add-on.

Calling WordPress a CMS is like calling the US Government a standing military force because it has the US Army/Navy/Air Force as an "add-on". O.o

I stand by my recommendation: Use WordPress only if it actually suits your needs - a blogging platform. If you need a proper CMS... use one. Don't shoehorn WordPress into that role.

You commented on Hugh Js's post almost 4 years

For an eCommerce solution, I'd really recommend using a dedicated 3rd-party service such as Shopify. However, FYI Craft's developers, Pixel & Tonic, just released their 1st-party CraftCommerce package that works with CraftCMS. Initial reviews are glowing. :)

FWIW, ExpressionEngine has 3 good-to-great 3rd-party e-commerce add-ons.

I'd still recommend using something like Shopify though... e-commerce is enough of a unique beast that - like CampaignMonitor or MailChimp for email - it's best to use a professional company dedicated to providing that solution as a service rather than rolling your own platform. That way at the very least, you benefit from having the burden of security headaches and system upgrade nightmares taken off your shoulders. :)

You commented on Hugh Js's post almost 4 years

Nooo, for the love of [insert whatever here] don't go the WordPress route... and all you people recommending it as a CMS should be ashamed of yourselves! WordPress is no more a CMS than Trump is presidential material; sure, it might kinda sorta work, but that's not what it's meant for and not what it's best at. WordPress is a great blogging platform that can be hacked (as in modified... altering PHP code) 6 ways from Sunday to do what you want, but it is NOT a CMS.

For a proper CMS, try something like Craft (https://craftcms.com/) or ExpressionEngine (https://ellislab.com/expressionengine). Both have free versions to let you get a taste for how they work, and you can even launch personal sites using the free versions.

The best thing about both of those platforms (and I'm sure many other REAL CMSes out there these days) is that they don't get in your way, HTML-wise. Their code output is 99.9% customizable by YOU, the designer. They also do a great job at content modelling - adjusting the sections and fields in those sections to perfectly suit YOUR content.

Needless to say, both work perfectly well with Foundation (or TBS, or whatever else you may want to use) - like I said, the HTML output is completely in your control, from <!doctype> to </html>. :)

You commented on Michael C.'s post over 4 years

Thanks for the links, Rafi. After a bunch of work, I've got the basic aspects working - switching tabs pauses one player and plays the other one from the timestamp -5s.

However, I'm having major issues with the fine-tuning... without going into details, it appears that Foundation only has a 'toggled' (i.e. after the tab switches) event, whereas I need to hook into a 'toggle' event - one that triggers before the tab switches.

Any ideas?

You commented on Mike Mannakee's post over 4 years

I'm getting this as well, but for me, even your code doesn't help. It appears like I'm seeing the 'toggled' event get triggered both on mouseup as well as on focus. :-/

When a tab has focus in the browser, and the entire browser loses and then regains OS focus, the 'toggled' event gets triggered once.

When I click on a different tab, the 'toggled' event gets triggered twice - once when I press the mouse button, and the second time when I release the mouse button. Because those are two separate events, not even the 'toggle_fired' flag is able to prevent things from being fired twice.

You commented on Christian's post over 4 years

Whatever else, that name has GOT to change: https://www.google.com/search?q=fapp

You commented on Michael C.'s post over 4 years

After looking at things more, the commit you referenced only affects when the main button triggers a modal. I'm using separate JS-based pop-up windows, not Reveal modals. It's the right idea for sure, but how to get it to apply to a call to open popup windows?

You commented on Michael C.'s post over 4 years

I think you meant this pen, Rafi: http://codepen.io/rafibomb/pen/WbzZOM ;)

What I'm wanting is for both the button, as well as the link(s) inside the dropdown to trigger popup windows. I don't want the pip that triggers the dropdown menu from also triggering a popup - that's the problem I'm wondering how to fix.

I'm not using a button group because a split button is more compact, and because it inherently indicates which action is the default one that most users will want to use, while making the alternative actions fairly simple to discover.

Also, I simplified the dropdown menu in my example here; in reality, it has 2-4 links (most of which will need to open a popup).

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