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Coder | Tucson, AZ

coding in the desert.

My Posts


  • 7
    Replies
  • Motion-UI on Scroll?

    By Jeremy Englert

    motion-ui

    Is it possible to trigger Motion-UI animations/transitions when an element becomes visible on a page? For example, I have an element near the bottom of the page that animates, however, I don't want the animate to trigger until the element is visible. ... (continued)

    Last Reply by Kaya Tuerkay over 1 year ago





  • 4
    Replies
  • Different height columns break grid?

    By Jeremy Englert

    grid

    I want to have 4 columns across on large screen, then transition to two columns on medium. This works fine if each of the columns have a similar height, however, if one of the columns has a dramatically different height, things break on the medium screen ... (continued)

    Last Reply by Rafi Benkual about 2 years ago





  • 3
    Replies
  • Flexible Logo in Topbar?

    By Jeremy Englert

    topbar

    I'm attempting to put a logo image in the top-bar navigation. This works great, however, the logo image doesn't seem to scale with the rest of the sidebar. Instead of getting smaller, the text is pushed beneath it. You can see a demo here: http://thea... (continued)

    Last Reply by dims almost 3 years ago


My Comments

Jeremy Englert commented on William Siebold's post 6 months

@Eli, can I help?

Jeremy Englert commented on Brandon Reynolds's post 6 months

As Rafi mentioned, FoundationPress supports WooCommerce. However, setting up the payment processing is independent of the theme.

Jeremy Englert commented on sten's post about 1 year

Would it be better to drop responsive design and instead make a separate mobile site and web site, one written for mobile and the other for desktop?
This issue would still exist though - as the datagrid isn't mobile friendly.
While it's far from an ideal situation, it may be worth keeping the page and displaying a message along the lines of "This data isn't available on mobile devices, please try again on a desktop device."
That prevents users from becoming frustrated by not being able to find the information.

Jeremy Englert commented on Carole Althaus's post about 1 year

Carole,
Did you follow the setup instructions listed here?
https://github.com/olefredrik/FoundationPress#quickstart
FoundationPress will require some familiarity with Sass, Gulp, NPM, etc.
 

Jeremy Englert commented on Cole Schweikhardt's post about 1 year

Hi Cole,
FoundationPress has a slightly different setup (as you've pointed out). 
"...where I should be working and what I should be publishing from..."
You'll want to make your custom changes in the /assets/scss/ directory. FoundationPress splits the styles into multiple Sass files (for organization). You can find the Foundation settings file in /assets/scss/global/.
"...even how to create the production version..."
FoundationPress has a few different Gulp commands, check them out here: https://github.com/olefredrik/FoundationPress#2-while-youre-working-on-your-project-run
"Is everything in the "foundation-sites" folder the core stuff that I leave alone?"
Try to avoid making changes to the Foundation files directly, as these will be overriden if you ever update Foundation. 
Can someone clarify the differences/goals for compiling? "Watch" is what I'm doing while working. But I'm not clear on "build" or "production."

I'm not 100% sure on this, but I think this is the basic breakdown
watch will watch files for changes and apply changes by running the build task
production is the same as build but minifies the files for production

Jeremy Englert commented on Rafi Benkual's post over 1 year

@E. Smythe - I'll pay you for those hours. I'll pay you the same hourly rate that you paid to use Foundation.

Really though, don't consider those hours "lost". By helping find bugs, you helped contribute to a large open source project used by thousands (millions?) of people. That's gotta be worth something! :)

Jeremy Englert commented on Rafi Benkual's post over 1 year

For me, the largest issue with the menus has been the little bugs, which has prevented users from really being able to play with them. With that being said, I absolutely love the concept behind the menu - having the power to chose different menu types and the screen sizes they are displayed on is wonderful.

However, the new menus are also quite complex compared to the F5 topbar and the documentation isn't always clear. This line is a great example:

"Our three Menu patterns form like Voltron into one responsive Menu plugin, which allows you to switch between patterns at different screen sizes."

  1. "Three Menu Patterns" is somewhat confusing. If you look at the documentation in the sidebar, you will see links for "Menu", "Dropdown Menu", "Drilldown Menu", "Top Bar", "Responsive Navigation", "Megellan", "Pagination" and "Breadcrumbs" - which of these is considered a menu pattern? After using it, I understand it, but it took some time to wrap my head around.

  2. I think even the term "Plugin" is somewhat confusing. It sounds as if an additional "plugin" is necessary for this to work. Maybe "component" is a better term?

  3. Having the three "patterns" completely separate from the "Responsive Navigation" docs is also somewhat confusing - as you need to completely understand the patterns to properly use the Responsive Navigation component.

I also think it would be great to have some "preset" type menus that require minimal code and a few CSS classes/JS attributes to make the magic happen. They wouldn't need to be as flexible as the menu patterns, but it would be nice for prototypes or basic menus (similar to the F5 topbar).

tl;dr - I think the concept behind the new menu is solid, but the small bugs and somewhat confusing documentation lead users to become frustrated with the menu before they get a chance to really enjoy it. I think clearer/restructured documentation would go a longgggg way in solving a lot of these "bugs".

Jeremy Englert commented on Russel Porosky's post over 1 year

Foundation 6 was a fairly huge makeover with the goal of creating a modular, lightweight framework that was easy to extend/adjust. While the changes may look/feel minor in a side-by-side comparison to Foundation 5 - that couldn't be much further from the truth.

Foundation 6 is infinitely times easier to extend than Foundation 5 giving developers that power to build almost anything we desire, but with great power comes great responsibility. Some of the items in Foundation 6 will be a bit "harder" to use (which I feel is the source of many of the "issues"), but once mastered, they become really fun to extend and build upon. The menu/topbar is a prime example of this.

With that being said, there are still plenty of bugs that ZURB and the community continue to work on everyday. One of the great benefits of ZURB is that almost all of the components work completely independent of eachother. So if you're having an issue with a specific component, you can simply axe it and roll your own solution without breaking the rest of the framework.

FYI - The Bootstrap GitHub repo has 300+ issues.

Jeremy Englert commented on Amelia Banks's post over 1 year

Amelia, Foundation is meant to help build custom designed websites - the design you linked to is already built/designed, so you wouldn't find much benefit in adding Foundation to it.

As Dave Daverson suggested, I would recommend trying out JointsWP (which I developed) or one of the many other Foundation "starter" themes. The these are normally "blank" but include all of the Foundation components. This allows you to design them however you please.

Jeremy Englert commented on Antonis Iliadis's post over 1 year

It's wonky to say the least.

It automatically converts unicode symbols into Emoji's. The arrow used in Orbit is unicode, so WordPress converts it to the ugly blue arrow Emoji.

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  • 23
    Replies
  • So Long and Farewell

    By Russel Porosky

    bug

    I used to love Foundation. It made all the things (well, most of them) nice and easy with a relative minimum of class name overhead. My designers would have their way with things and I never worried about whether or not those things would be troublesome. ... (continued)

    Last Reply by Emlyn A. 9 months ago





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My Posts

My Comments

You commented on William Siebold's post 6 months

@Eli, can I help?

You commented on Brandon Reynolds's post 6 months

As Rafi mentioned, FoundationPress supports WooCommerce. However, setting up the payment processing is independent of the theme.

You commented on sten's post about 1 year

Would it be better to drop responsive design and instead make a separate mobile site and web site, one written for mobile and the other for desktop?
This issue would still exist though - as the datagrid isn't mobile friendly.
While it's far from an ideal situation, it may be worth keeping the page and displaying a message along the lines of "This data isn't available on mobile devices, please try again on a desktop device."
That prevents users from becoming frustrated by not being able to find the information.

You commented on Carole Althaus's post about 1 year

Carole,
Did you follow the setup instructions listed here?
https://github.com/olefredrik/FoundationPress#quickstart
FoundationPress will require some familiarity with Sass, Gulp, NPM, etc.
 

You commented on Cole Schweikhardt's post about 1 year

Hi Cole,
FoundationPress has a slightly different setup (as you've pointed out). 
"...where I should be working and what I should be publishing from..."
You'll want to make your custom changes in the /assets/scss/ directory. FoundationPress splits the styles into multiple Sass files (for organization). You can find the Foundation settings file in /assets/scss/global/.
"...even how to create the production version..."
FoundationPress has a few different Gulp commands, check them out here: https://github.com/olefredrik/FoundationPress#2-while-youre-working-on-your-project-run
"Is everything in the "foundation-sites" folder the core stuff that I leave alone?"
Try to avoid making changes to the Foundation files directly, as these will be overriden if you ever update Foundation. 
Can someone clarify the differences/goals for compiling? "Watch" is what I'm doing while working. But I'm not clear on "build" or "production."

I'm not 100% sure on this, but I think this is the basic breakdown
watch will watch files for changes and apply changes by running the build task
production is the same as build but minifies the files for production

You commented on Rafi Benkual's post over 1 year

@E. Smythe - I'll pay you for those hours. I'll pay you the same hourly rate that you paid to use Foundation.

Really though, don't consider those hours "lost". By helping find bugs, you helped contribute to a large open source project used by thousands (millions?) of people. That's gotta be worth something! :)

You commented on Rafi Benkual's post over 1 year

For me, the largest issue with the menus has been the little bugs, which has prevented users from really being able to play with them. With that being said, I absolutely love the concept behind the menu - having the power to chose different menu types and the screen sizes they are displayed on is wonderful.

However, the new menus are also quite complex compared to the F5 topbar and the documentation isn't always clear. This line is a great example:

"Our three Menu patterns form like Voltron into one responsive Menu plugin, which allows you to switch between patterns at different screen sizes."

  1. "Three Menu Patterns" is somewhat confusing. If you look at the documentation in the sidebar, you will see links for "Menu", "Dropdown Menu", "Drilldown Menu", "Top Bar", "Responsive Navigation", "Megellan", "Pagination" and "Breadcrumbs" - which of these is considered a menu pattern? After using it, I understand it, but it took some time to wrap my head around.

  2. I think even the term "Plugin" is somewhat confusing. It sounds as if an additional "plugin" is necessary for this to work. Maybe "component" is a better term?

  3. Having the three "patterns" completely separate from the "Responsive Navigation" docs is also somewhat confusing - as you need to completely understand the patterns to properly use the Responsive Navigation component.

I also think it would be great to have some "preset" type menus that require minimal code and a few CSS classes/JS attributes to make the magic happen. They wouldn't need to be as flexible as the menu patterns, but it would be nice for prototypes or basic menus (similar to the F5 topbar).

tl;dr - I think the concept behind the new menu is solid, but the small bugs and somewhat confusing documentation lead users to become frustrated with the menu before they get a chance to really enjoy it. I think clearer/restructured documentation would go a longgggg way in solving a lot of these "bugs".

You commented on Russel Porosky's post over 1 year

Foundation 6 was a fairly huge makeover with the goal of creating a modular, lightweight framework that was easy to extend/adjust. While the changes may look/feel minor in a side-by-side comparison to Foundation 5 - that couldn't be much further from the truth.

Foundation 6 is infinitely times easier to extend than Foundation 5 giving developers that power to build almost anything we desire, but with great power comes great responsibility. Some of the items in Foundation 6 will be a bit "harder" to use (which I feel is the source of many of the "issues"), but once mastered, they become really fun to extend and build upon. The menu/topbar is a prime example of this.

With that being said, there are still plenty of bugs that ZURB and the community continue to work on everyday. One of the great benefits of ZURB is that almost all of the components work completely independent of eachother. So if you're having an issue with a specific component, you can simply axe it and roll your own solution without breaking the rest of the framework.

FYI - The Bootstrap GitHub repo has 300+ issues.

You commented on Amelia Banks's post over 1 year

Amelia, Foundation is meant to help build custom designed websites - the design you linked to is already built/designed, so you wouldn't find much benefit in adding Foundation to it.

As Dave Daverson suggested, I would recommend trying out JointsWP (which I developed) or one of the many other Foundation "starter" themes. The these are normally "blank" but include all of the Foundation components. This allows you to design them however you please.

You commented on Antonis Iliadis's post over 1 year

It's wonky to say the least.

It automatically converts unicode symbols into Emoji's. The arrow used in Orbit is unicode, so WordPress converts it to the ugly blue arrow Emoji.

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